What is your REAL skill level in table-tennis

When it comes to table-tennis, somehow everyone is a legend in their own mind or is a champion of their neighborhood or bar or is a “professional” player or a (usually junior) champion of their own state or province or even their old country.  This is most likely because “ping-pong” (as it is known not so affectionately) is a silly basement game anyone can master in a few hours.

Anyway if you are interested in the “sport” of table-tennis, the table below may give you a rude awakening to reality and give you more or less an accurate picture of where you stand.  Table-tennis does have a really good rating system (though far from perfect) and rates all players from beginner to world champion. Another great fact about table-tennis is that it uses the same single combined rating list for men & women, women are free to compete against each other in many lower level tournaments at least in North America and this gives a great absolute reference point without discriminating against women (or players with disabilities….known as para) . This is because, though the power, speed & spin levels are usually higher when two men of  more or less equal ratings face each other, it does not necessarily guarantee that the male can beat a female player of more or less same rating except  at the highest level (Upsets have been know to happen even at the highest levels more than once in a while) . This is because the combination of so many playing styles that exist in table-tennis makes each player very unique lot more so than in any other sport.  This equalizing effect makes table-tennis for more fun for women as compared most other sport.

This rating system was developed in the USA based on chess rating system and may look somewhat identical if you are familiar with chess system. Also note that ITTF uses a different system which only applies to mostly professional & international players but the USATT system gives you the whole picture based on the fact that many foreign players play in US tournaments and get rated and this gives a good comparison reference, though actual ratings exist only for players who play in a tournament held in USA.  There is also another independent worldwide rating system known as Ratings Central but there are some key differences.

 Any person can get a rating by playing in a USATT league or a USATT tournament.  Your rating may not be initially very accurate since you may have only played against few rated players. As you start playing against more players or same players more times, you will get a more accurate number for your skill level. Also as you may know in any sport, if player (or team)  A beats B and B beats C and C beats D, it does not guarantee that A can beat D and this is all the more true in table-tennis, not only because there are so many playing styles in table-tennis but also because the combination of these various styles manifests into each player having their own unique style more than in any sport.

 

 USATT Rating to Skill Level Translation Chart

Your rating is sort of inverse of your ranking (The player with highest rating number is “ranked” #1)

Player's USATT Rating

Player's Skill Level Group (men)

Player's Skill Level Group (women)

0

Non-Player

Non-Player

Below 1101

Novice

Novice

1101-1401

Beginner

Beginner

1401-1700

Intermediate

Intermediate

1701-1900

Advanced

Advanced / Expert

1901-2100

Expert

Expert / Master

2101-2300

Master

National Level ( Grand Master)

2301-2600

National Level ( Grand Master )

International Level (International Grand Master) / Touring Pro

2601-2700

International Level (International Grand Master)

ITTF World ranking List - Top 50 (Touring Professional)

2701-2850

ITTF World ranking top 100 to 200 (Touring Professional )

ITTF Women’s World ranking List - Top 5

2851-2950

ITTF Men’s World ranking List - Top 10 to 20

None

3000

Perfection (Normalization point)

Perfection (Normalization point)

Note :- Same USATT rating database is used (& processed mixed) for men & women combined. Rating number is the inverse of ranking index number. Higher the rating number, lower the ranking number index. Higher the ranking index number, the lower the rating number.

 

The Rating exchange chart below is used to calculate your rating for an individual match

Your final rating is based on ALL matches & not just your one head-to-head amazing upset win J

The USATT computer calculates your ratings NOT any club administrator

Point Differential (Spread ) Between Players

Expected Result (Higher Rated Player Wins): Number of points exchanged (or gained by higher rated player & lost by lower rated player)

Upset Result (Lower Rated Player Wins): Number of points exchanged (or gained by lower rated player & lost by higher rated player)

0 - 12

8

8

13 - 37

7

10

38 - 62

6

13

63 - 87

5

16

88 - 112

4

20

113 - 137

3

25

138 - 162

2

30

163 - 187

2

35

188 - 212

1

40

213 - 237

1

45

238 and up

0

50Bottom of Form

Note :- This simple point exchange method is for USATT leagues only. The USATT tournament system uses same point exchanges but on a little more accurate multiple iterations (4 steps) calculations (as compared to single step iteration for leagues) . More information can be found at   . https://www.teamusa.org/USA-Table-Tennis/Ratings/Rating-System  .